Broadhead Regulations

Explore our guide on the legality of the EXODUS® Swept broadheads across different states. We break down where you can and can’t use them due to being classified as a barbed broadhead. Here, you will also find the regulation verbiage and a resource link for each state. Barbed broadhead regulations differ across states. We trust this guide aids in understanding the legality in your area.

 

Disclaimer: Please note that the information provided on this page regarding lawful and unlawful hunting areas is intended for reference purposes only. Hunters are reminded that it is their responsibility to familiarize themselves with and adhere to all relevant laws, regulations, and guidelines governing hunting activities in their respective regions. We do not accept any liability for actions taken based on the information provided herein.

Lawful

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
North Carolina

Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Unlawful

Alaska
Hawaii
Idaho
Minnesota
New York
North Dakota
Oregon
Washington

Broadhead Regulations by State

Alabama 

Resource 

A legal bow for hunting is defined as either a long bow, a recurve bow, or a compound bow or a crossbow. It shall be unlawful, except as otherwise provided by law or regulation, for any person to hunt deer and turkey with bow and arrows that are not in conformance with the following specifications: 

  • Bows must have a minimum peak tension (within the user’s normal draw length) of 30 pounds. Crossbows must have a minimum peak tension of 85 pounds at normal draw length. 
  • Arrows shall be equipped with a broadhead which has a minimum cutting diameter of 7/8 inch and 2 sharpened edges. 
  • Crossbows must be equipped with a working safety. 

 

Alaska

 

You may not hunt big game with a bow unless the broadhead is a fixed, replaceable, or mechanical/retractable blade type and not barbed. 

Barbed is defined as an arrowhead with any fixed portion of the rear edge of the arrowhead forming an angle less than 90 degrees with the shaft when measured from the nock end of the arrow. A notch or space of no more than two millimeters between the base of the blade and the shaft shall not be considered a barb. 

Broadhead is defined as a fixed, replaceable, or mechanical/retractable blade-type arrowhead that is not barbed with two or more sharp cutting edges having a minimum cutting diameter of 7/8”. 

 

Arizona 

Resource 

All broadheads used must be no less than 7/8 inch in width with metal cutting edges.       

 

Arkansas 

Resource

Deer, turkey and bear hunters must use arrowheads at least 7/8-inches wide. Poison may not be used on arrows. 

 

California

Resource

For the taking of big game and turkey, hunting arrows and crossbow bolts with a broad head type blade which will not pass through a hole seven-eighths inch in diameter shall be used. Mechanical/retractable broad heads shall be measured in the open position. 

 

Colorado 

Resource

Handheld bows, including compound bows, using arrows equipped with a broadhead with an outside diameter or width of at least 7/8 of an inch with no less than two steel cutting edges. Each cutting edge must be in the same plane throughout the length of the cutting surface. 

 

Connecticut

Resource

An arrowhead must have at least two blades and must be at least 7/8 inch wide at its widest point when hunting deer and turkey. Arrowheads that are designed to open on impact are legal provided they meet the above requirement.

 

Delaware 

Resource

You may not hunt deer during archery or crossbow season while also having in your possession any weapon or firearm other than a knife, a longbow or crossbow and sharpened broadhead arrows having a minimum width of 7/8”. You may not use or have in your possession any poison arrows or arrows with explosive tips. 

 

Florida

Resource

Arrows used to take deer, turkeys or hogs must be equipped with broadheads having at least two sharpened edges with minimum widths of 7/8 inch.

 

Georgia

Resource

Arrows for hunting deer, bear or feral hog must be broadhead type. There are no restrictions on broadhead cutting edges, broadhead material, or crossbow broadhead diameter.      

 

Hawaii

Resource

No person shall possess any poisonous, drugged, explosive, or barbed arrows. A barbed arrow is defined as one with points or barbs that protrude backward from the head or point of the arrow such that they may hook or keep the arrow from being pulled through the point of penetration without tearing the flesh of the animal. Only arrows having a minimum blade cutting diameter width of 3/4 inch are permitted.      

 

Idaho

Resource

In any hunt, including general any-weapon seasons and short range hunts, it is unlawful to pursue or kill big game animals: 

  • With arrows or bolts having broadheads measuring less than 7/8 inch in width and having a primary cutting edge less than 0.015 inch thick 
  • With an arrow or bolt wherein the broadhead does not precede shaft and nock 
  • With any chemicals or explosives attached to the arrow or bolt 
  • With arrows or bolts having expanding broadheads 
  • With arrows or bolts having barbed broadheads, which is a broadhead with any portion of which forms an angle less than 90 degrees with the shaft or ferrule 

 

Illinois

Resource 

Broadheads may have fixed or expandable cutting surfaces, but they must have a minimum 7/8 inch diameter when fully opened. Broadheads with fixed cutting surfaces must be metal or flint-,chert-, or obsidian-knapped; broadheads with expandable cutting surfaces must be metal.      

    

Indiana

Resource

Arrows must be tipped with broadheads that are metal, metal-edged, or napped flint, chert or obsidian. Poisoned or exploding arrows are illegal.      

 

Iowa 

Resource

Longbows, recurve bows, and compound bows shooting broadhead arrows are permitted. There are no minimum draw weights for bows or minimum diameter for broadheads. No explosive or chemical devices may be attached to the arrow or broadhead. 

 

Kansas

Resource

Each arrow used for hunting big game shall be equipped with a broadhead point incapable of passing through a ring with a diameter of three-quarters of an inch when fully expanded. A big game hunter using archery equipment may possess non-broadhead-tipped arrows while hunting if the arrows are not used to take or attempt to take big game animals. Devices capable of dispensing chemicals to take big game animals may not be used.    

 

Kentucky

Resource

Fixed blade or mechanical broadheads at least 7/8” wide (when blades extended), but broadheads may NOT be chemically-treated.   

     

Louisiana

Resource

Longbow, compound bow and crossbow or any bow drawn, held or released by mechanical means will be a legal means of take for all properly licensed hunters. Bow and arrow fishermen must have a sport fishing license and not carry any arrows with broadhead points unless a big game season is in progress.        

 

Maine 

Resource

Arrowheads (including expandable mechanical broadheads) must be at least 7/8 inch in width. It is unlawful to use a set bow, or to use arrows with poisonous or explosive tips.

 

Maryland

Resource

An individual may hunt deer and black bear with a bow that propels an arrow at least 18” in length with a minimum speed of 300 feet per second at release, uses an arrow with a sharpened broadhead with metal points and a minimum width of 7/8 inch, and has a working safety if the device is fired by a trigger. 

 

Massachusetts

Resource

Archery equipment may be used during archery season, shotgun season, and primitive firearms season. Arrows must have a well sharpened steel broadhead blade no less than 7/8 inches in width. Expanding broadheads are legal.  

 

Michigan

Resource

When hunting deer, bear, elk, and turkey, crossbow hunters must use only arrows, bolts, and quarrels at least 14 inches in length and tipped with a broadhead point at least 7/8 inches wide. 

 

Minnesota

Resource

Arrowheads used for taking big game must have a minimum of two metal cutting edges, be of barbless broadhead design, with a diameter of at least ⅞ inch. “Expandable” broadheads may be used to take big game if they meet the requirements above and: 1) are at least ⅞ inch in width and no more than 2 inches in width at or after impact; and 2) are of a barbless design and function in a barbless manner 

 

Mississippi

Resource

Longbows, recurves, compound bows, and crossbows. There is no minimum or maximum draw weight. There is no minimum arrow length. Fixed or mechanical broadheads may be used. 

 

Missouri

Resource

Methods allowed: Longbows, compound bows or recurve bows of any draw weight; no restrictions on broadheads. 

 

Montana

Resource

Arrows must have a broadhead with at least two cutting edges. Expandable broadheads are legal as long as they are 7/8 inches at the widest point and weigh no less than 70 grains. 

 

Nebraska

Resource

Arrows must have a sharpened broadhead with a blade no less than 7/16 of an inch and cutting radius from the center of the shaft. It is never legal to use arrows which have been chemically dipped or equipped with explosives in the state of Nebraska. 

 

Nevada

Resource

Arrows used in hunting big game mammals must be at least 24 inches long, weigh at least 300 grains and have: 

(a) Fixed broadheads that are at least 7/8-inch wide at the widest point; or 

(b) Expandable, mechanical broadheads that are at least 7/8-inch wide at the widest point when the broadhead is in the open position. 

 

New Hampshire 

Resource

Archers and crossbow hunters must have their name and address on arrows or bolts. Fixed blade broadheads cannot be less than ⅞ inches wide and no more than 1½ inches wide. Retractable blade broadheads are permitted (but cannot be less than ⅞ of an inch wide when open). 

 

New Jersey

Resource

Arrows must be fitted with a well-sharpened metal broadhead with a minimum width of 3/4 inch. 

 

New Mexico

Resource

Arrows must have broadheads with steel cutting edges. No drugs may be used on arrows. Arrows cannot be driven by explosives. 

 

New York

Resource

It is unlawful to hunt big game with arrows with barbed broadheads; arrowheads less than 7/8 inches at the widest point or with less than 2 sharp cutting edges. 

Barbed broadheads are illegal for hunting big game. A barbed broadhead is one in which the angle formed between the trailing or rear edge of any blade and the shaft is less than 90 degrees. 

 

North Carolina 

Resource

When used to hunt bear, deer, elk, wild turkey, alligator, and feral swine, only arrows and bolts with a fixed minimum broadhead width of 7/8 of an inch or a mechanically opening broadhead with a width of at least 7/8 of an inch in the open position shall be used. Blunt-type arrow heads may be used in taking small animals and birds, including rabbits, squirrels, quail, and grouse. Poisonous, drugged, or explosive arrowheads shall not be used for taking any wildlife. 

 

North Dakota

Resource

Arrows must be at least 24 inches long, tipped with a metal broadhead with at least two sharp cutting edges, and have a cutting diameter of at least 3/4 inch (i.e., not able to pass through a 3/4 inch ring). It is illegal to hunt big game with barbed arrows (barbed refers to an arrowhead with any fixed portion of the rear or trailing edge of the arrowhead forming an angle less than 90 degrees with the shaft). Broadheads with mechanical or retractable blades are legal. Arrows capable of causing damage or injury in excess of that inflicted by the cutting edges of the broadhead are prohibited (e.g., explosive arrow points, arrows tipped with drugs or chemicals, and pneumatic or hydraulic shafts are illegal). 

 

Ohio

Resource

The arrow tip shall have a minimum of two cutting edges which may be exposed or unexposed and a minimum 3/4 inch width. Expandable and mechanical broadheads are legal. Poisoned or explosive arrows are illegal. 

                 

Oklahoma 

Resource

Arrows / bolts must be fitted with a hunting type point no less than 7/8 inches wide, including mechanical broadheads with this width requirement when fully open. 

 

Oregon

Resource

Broadheads must be unbarbed and at least 7/8″ wide. Broadheads with moveable blades that fold/collapse when withdrawn are not considered barbed. Western gray squirrel may also be hunted with small game arrow points/heads. There are no restrictions on the type of arrows or broadheads which may be used to hunt game birds. 

 

Pennsylvania

Resource

Broadheads must have a fixed or mechanical tip with sharpened cutting edges consisting of metal or naturally occurring stone. The broadhead must have an outside diameter or width of at least 7/8 of an inch, and the length may not exceed 3.25 inches. 

 

Rhode Island

Resource

You may use a long bow, recurve bow, compound bow, or crossbow for hunting deer. 

The long bow, recurve bow, and compound bow must be set at no less than 40 pounds for archers using fixed blade broadheads. These bows must be set at a minimum of 50 pounds for archers using mechanical broadheads. 

For the long bow, recurve bow, and compound bow, only broadhead-tipped arrows with at least two metal cutting edges are allowed. All broadheads must be 7/8 of an inch or greater at the widest point. This includes mechanical broadheads measured in the open position. 

Crossbows must be set at no less than 125 pounds minimum draw weight. One field point arrow may be carried in the quiver for the safe discharge of the crossbow. The field point arrow must be a different color from the crossbow arrow so that they can be easily distinguished. 

You may use archery equipment for small game hunting, meeting the minimum draw weight required for deer hunting. Arrows tipped with small game blunts or JUDO points may be used. However, broadhead or field point arrows may not be used for small game hunting. 

 

South Carolina

Resource

There are no restrictions on draw weight/length, arrow weight/length, or broadhead weight, width, or style. 

 

South Dakota

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Archery hunters are required to use a broadhead when hunting any big game, including turkeys both in the spring and fall seasons. Archers can still possess an arrow tipped with any point while in the field for practice. In addition, archery hunters must use a bow with a minimum of 40 pounds of draw weight when hunting elk and of 30 pounds when hunting all other big game animals. 

 

Tennessee

Resource

Hunting arrows and bolts must be equipped with sharpened broadheads. 

 

Texas

Resource

While hunting game animals and game birds, a projectile may not be poisoned, drugged, or explosive. When used to hunt turkey and all game animals other than squirrels, a projectile must be equipped with a broadhead hunting point. An archer may have arrows/bolts with field, target, or JUDO points in the quiver with the broadhead hunting points. There are no restrictions or minimum requirements on arrow or bolt length, arrow material, arrow weight, lighted nocks, broadhead lengths or diameter, number of cutting edges, broadhead material, or mechanical broadheads. 

 

Utah

Resource 

Fixed broadheads must have two or more sharp cutting edges that cannot pass through a 7/8-inch ring. Expandable, mechanical broadheads must have two or more sharp cutting edges that cannot pass through a 7/8-inch ring when expanded. Arrows with chemically treated or explosive arrowheads may not be used to take big game. 

 

Vermont

Resource

The arrowhead must be at least 7⁄8 of an inch in width with two or more cutting edges. 

 

Virginia

Resource

Broadhead widths must be at least 7/8-inch wide or expand upon impact to 7/8-inch. It is unlawful to use explosive head arrows or arrows to which any drug, chemical, or toxic substance has been added. 

 

Washington

Resource

Arrows used for big game hunting must weigh a minimum of 6 grains per pound, with a minimum arrow weight of 300 grains, including the broadhead. Broadheads must be sharp and be a minimum of 7/8″ wide. Barbed broadheads are illegal. 

 

West Virginia

Resource

It is illegal to hunt wild turkey, bear, deer or boar with arrows with broadheads having less than two sharp cutting edges measuring less than 3/4 of an inch in width. It is also illegal to use an arrow with an explosive, drug-laced or poisoned head or shaft. 

 

Wisconsin

Resource

Bows must have a draw weight of 30 pounds or greater, and metal broadheads must be at least 7/8 of an inch wide and kept sharp. Stone arrow heads may be used. You may not possess any poison, drug, or explosive-tipped arrow while hunting. 

 

Wyoming

Resource

The broadhead used on arrows or bolts shall not pass through a 7/8 inch solid ring when fully expanded. 

 

To learn about EXODUS® Swept regulations state-by-state please follow the link below.